?“Ice Break” by Astrid Blodgett Essay

Ice Break is a short narrative from the anthology “The Journey Prize Stories 24” written by Astrid Blodgett in 2012. We don’t cognize precisely where the narrative takes topographic point, but we know it is some topographic point cold, because there is ice on the lake, and snow on the roads. It could really perchance be Canada since Blodgett is Canadian. It takes topographic point in modern times, and we know this because there are modern twenty-four hours things like telecastings and autos.

The narrative is about a household of 5. Ma, pa, and three girls. They seem to hold a good relationship overall, but we get a sense that something is unusual about their relationship. First of all, they have household meetings, where they have treatments about what parent is traveling to be with what kid. Dawn, the storyteller, says that these household meetings ne’er truly work, because the childs can ne’er make up one’s mind what, or with whom they want to be about. Another thing that hints to the reader that this household has some issues is what Marla says before they head to the lake. She hints to her sisters that her parents were traveling to be like their old neighbours Mr. and Mrs. Pichowsky. The Pichowskys divorced a twelvemonth before, and the female parent moved far off from the pa, and took the kids with her. Marla is the oldest sister. We know this because she has a occupation as a baby-sitter, wears a batch of make-up, and morning describes that, as they eat Saturday forenoon brunch, they sit in a row, tallest to shortest.

Oldest to youngest, and here Marla is mentioned foremost. Therefore she must be oldest, since we know for a fact that Janie is the youngest. Janie is nine old ages old, and she does non desire to travel on the ice fishing trip at first, but Dawn bribes her with five dollars. Janie is non a smart as her sisters, likely because she is younger. Dawn knows she can convert Janie to travel if she merely bribes her, since five dollars is a batch if you are nine old ages old. Janie besides doesn’t understand when Marla jokes about the Pichowskys, once more she doesn’t think like her older sisters. The female parent of the household is really protective. She tells them to be careful on the ice, and she does non desire to travel with them out on the lake, because it is excessively hazardous. The female parent is besides really emotional. She is improbably sad, after the decease of her hubby and girl. Any female parent would be. But she does non look to fault anyone. She knows Dawn bribed Janie with five dollars, but still is non upset with Dawn, even after she sees the five-dollar measure in Janie’s pockets. Both Dawn and Marla seem really sad about their loss. But Dawn does non advert any of them shouting, merely their female parent.

But we do cognize that Dawn wishes they would wake up “I looked at their thoraxs for the longest clip waiting for them to travel up and down.”1 And we know that Marla feels really bad about the mention she made to the Pichowskys. “I asked Marla, when ma wasn’t near, what she meant about the Pichowskys, and she said she didn’t remember. But her face turned bright pink, so I knew she knew.” The two sisters might be in a province of daze. It is really uneven that they don’t even seem that affected by it. The whole household is really loved in their community. Marla says, after the funeral, that their place is like a flower store. Meaning they must hold gotten a batch of flowers from friends and household. The male parents name is Sam. Sam seems, at first, like a reasonably careless individual. He does ‘nt care if it’s unsafe to travel ice fishing, he still goes. He’s a spot of a bang searcher. At the beginning of the narrative he seems really irritated and cranky, and Acts of the Apostless like he does non desire anyone to travel with him on the fishing trip. But when the accident happens, he is making everything he can, to seek and salvage his girls lives. Dawn thinks for a piece he is still angry, as the truck s sinking, but finally she realizes he is non. “Dad’s non angry. He’s frightened.” As mentioned earlier Dawn is the storyteller, and she is besides the supporter.

She is really cautious. For illustration when the male parent turns a small excessively rapidly on the route, she grabs the dashboard really rapidly “..and I grabbed on, handprints like claws.” She besides gets really amazed when the truck is droping into the H2O. She describes it really diagrammatically, and like everything is in slow gesture. “His face is ruddy and is moth is traveling like he’s cheering, but I cant hear anything. I’ve gone deaf. His eyes are close to my face and bulging.“ She can’t move, and she can’t speak for a piece, but finally she snaps out of it and escapes the H2O. Subjects of this narrative are: household love and forfeit. This narrative is about a household who, even though they had issues, loved each other really much. Sam sacrifices himself to seek and salvage his two girls from submerging, because of the eternal love he has for them. The two older girls now merely have their female parent, and she must now stay strong for the interest of her household. Therefore she tries to merely look on the positive side of everything, and ne’er advert the bad material. “Mom said over and over, at least he ( the male parent ) was making something he loved.” She gives her everything to remain strong for her kids.

The construction of the narrative is a small different than most. It has two narrative lines, being described along each other, the accident, and what happened before the accident. Then at the terminal, they both merge together, at the funeral. The narrative has a batch of little paragraphs, and it switches from, ‘the accident’ to the ‘before the accident’ back and Forth. Some paragraphs are longer than others ; particularly the 1s ‘before the accident’ are rather long. First paragraph is from after they’ve left to travel fishing, but before the existent accident. Then there’s a long paragraph presenting the household ( before the accident ) , and the following paragraph leaps right into the minute where the truck is really sinking, and Dawn feels stunned. Then the narrative jumps back and Forth between the these two, until the point in the, ‘before the accident’ narrative line, where Sam drives the truck into the lake, and the narrative line is now caught up with what is go oning ‘during the accident’ . The narrative ends on a really sad note, with a description of the wake of the ice fishing accident.